Programmes

Course List


Course Code Course Title Units
ENGE1000 English Studies: Thinking Creatively in a Global Language
Using language is one of the most creative and distinctive activities that makes us human. We are aware of this creativity when we read imaginative literature, but we also experience it di-rectly in our own everyday language use. This course offers both a linguistic and literary per-spective on the various ways in which language influences and shapes such things as, our iden-tity, our emotions, our sense of humour, our experience of technology, and our membership to society. Students learn to analyse and appreciate a range of linguistic, literary and cultural phe-nomena, including works from the traditional genres of fiction, poetry and drama, as well as other media such as, film, song, and art. From a linguistic perspective, we examine the ways in which language is structured and used creatively for different purposes in both local and global contexts. From a literary perspective, we examine how the creative use of language in literary works is part of how we construct the world and make sense of our place in it. By focusing on different text and media from different times and places, this course aims to foster new under-standings of how language is a powerful tool in shaping our capacities to reflect on our own world and to imagine other worlds beyond it.
3
ENGE1310 Communications for English Majors I
This course provides you with the communication skills necessary to perform various academic and non-academic tasks in both online and offline contexts. It demonstrates how differences in audience, communicative purpose and medium shape the content and structure of various written and spoken genres. It also discusses different patterns of development such as narration, description, exemplification, and persuasion, and the importance of thesis statements and topic sentences in organizing ideas. To help you develop an awareness of the structural and stylistic differences of various genres, you will produce a personal reflective essay, a literary analysis paper, and a persuasive presentation, that will be presented in various print, face-to-face and digital formats, using both linguistic and multimodal resources. Through a process oriented approach, you will be producing outlines and drafts of these writing tasks, get feedback, and learn writing strategies such as using sensory details, choosing active, specific verbs, and employing cohesive devices. Recognizing how technology shapes communication practices in diverse ways, this course also draws attention to the affordances and constraints of digital tools such as WordPress, Blackboard, Zoom, and social media platforms.
3
ENGE1320 Communications for English Majors II
This course builds on the foundational communication skills introduced in ENGE 1310 and helps you develop the competencies necessary to conduct effective research. It examines the existing structures and conventions of various print and digital genres such as journal articles, blogs, infographics, and YouTube videos. It also discusses different patterns of development such as definition, problem/ solution, comparison/ contrast, classification and division, and the importance of maintaining an appropriate register and style. To help you produce and consume knowledge in creative and critical ways, you will construct an abstract, an annotated bibliography, a literature review, a video, and a research article that discusses an issue in applied linguistics. These texts will be constructed for real world audiences and will involve the use of various multimodal resources. Through a process-oriented approach, you will be producing outlines and drafts of these writing tasks, get feedback, and learn writing strategies such as signposting, using signal phrases, and constructing parallel structures. Recognizing the increasing importance of technology in producing and consuming knowledge, this course also discusses the use of various digital tools such as search engines, reference management software, blogging and video editing platforms.
3
ENGE1500 Introduction to English Linguistics
This course offers an overview of the linguistic structure of English. We systematically study the English language and human language in general at various levels: words, phrases, sentences and beyond. It also provides students with the opportunity to observe and explain the ways in which English is used in everyday life.
3
ENGE1520 Grammatical Structure of English
This course is designed to provide students with the terminology and analytical skills necessary to describe the grammatical structure of English sentences and their parts. The grammatical concepts and categories introduced in this course are largely ‘traditional’, and common to the competing schools of linguistics.
3
ENGE1610 Introduction to Literature
This course will introduce students to methods of reading literary texts from the major genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. It will illustrate basic literary terms and concepts, and closely study a variety of literary texts written in different times and countries. The emphasis will be on close reading, analysing how the meaning of a literary text is informed by its formal elements and literary conventions. At the same time, the course will also give students an awareness of the interaction between text and context, creative writing and critical reception, and the inheritance and transformation of literary tradition.
3
ENGE1800 Drama in Performance I
Students will study short plays and excerpts from longer plays, workshop them in small groups, with the aim of performing pieces of similar length before an audience. Students will be taught how to interpret a play from a dramaturgical point of view, and be equipped with the fundamental techniques of voice production, creating a character, directing, and interpreting a text for performance.
3
ENGE1900 Heroes and Monsters: From Gilgamesh to Game of Thrones
What is a hero? The stories we read, as well as the movies and television programmes we watch are full of heroism, but do we really know what a hero is? Does a hero have to be good? Do they have to be strong? Do they have to win in the end? Do we have to like them? This course will address many of these questions in relation to many different texts from a wide variety of media: from one of the earliest surviving texts of the ancient world, The Epic of Gilgamesh to the recent global phenomenon, Game of Thrones. We will look especially at the way heroes are shaped by the monsters that they do battle against. Some monsters are fought with fists and swords, but others must be defeated through other means for they lie within the hero himself.
3
ENGE2100 Research and Oral Reporting
This is a course designed to integrate the skills used in the earlier communicative skills courses. In particular, students will be provided with opportunities to express their opinions and to practise using evidence, data and sources in the preparation of their own oral and written work. In addition, students will gain experience in seminar-related skills by presenting the fruits of their research to classmates through oral presentations.
3
ENGE2110 Crime Fiction
(UGED2195 is double-coded with ENGE2110.) This course takes a closer look at the genre of crime fiction. The course outlines a broad perspective of the genre of crime fiction from its earliest incarnations to modern-day TV drama. We will explore a variety of different forms of crime fiction, and how the genre more generally reflects cultural, historical and social issues. The study material for this course will consist of literary texts, TV series, and films drawn from the popular cultural canon. Topics we will discuss include conspiracy, serial crime, trauma, the epistemology of clues, history and crime, and the criminal mind. The course begins with a historical overview of detective fiction, and concludes with a creative workshop on how to write a detective story. Students with a taste for murder, crime, and suspense — and above all the desire to solve enigmas and mysteries — are welcome to attend this course.
3
ENGE2120 Literature and Human Rights
(UGED2185 is double-coded with ENGE2120.) This course takes a closer look at the intimate connections between literature and human rights. The history of human rights has always been accompanied by literary texts; conversely, some of the most important literary texts in the world have focused on human rights issues. People who have suffered abuse and human rights violations have often articulated their painful stories in a variety of literary genres — in the hope of being heard, achieving recognition, bearing witness to events that have defined their lives. These stories thus constitute important documents around which rights campaigns and communities are built. During the course, we will look at the history of human rights literature, as well as various case studies — including Stolen Generation narratives in Australia, narratives by women who were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army, political dissident narratives, and more recent refugee literature. No previous studies in literature needed to take this course. Students interested exploring the relevance of literary imagination and narrative for human rights discourse are welcome to attend this course.
3
ENGE2130 (How to Read) Masterpieces of Literature
(UGED2186 is double-coded with ENGE2130.) Why read literature? This course offers a broad look through literary history to understand the enduring value and diversity of literature. For each lecture, we will look at a literary masterpiece — from antiquity to the present — and address three main issues: A) the work and its historical context; B) how to read it; and C) themes that make the work relevant in contemporary society and in our everyday lives. The course is designed as an introductory survey of literary works that have had a major impact throughout the ages. Issue A) is intended to give students a sense of the work’s impact in its own time; B) is designed to provide students with the conceptual tools and methodologies to understand a classic work of literature; while C) will provide students with an opportunity to make connections between their own individual concerns and those of the great characters of literature. At the end of the course, students will have encountered some of the most esteemed classics in literary history. No previous studies in literature needed to take this course. Students interested in discussing the ideas, ideals and values of classic literary texts are welcome to attend this course.
3
ENGE2140 Superheroes in Graphic Novel, Comics and Film
(UGED2187 is double-coded with ENGE2140.) This course aims to provide a historical and cultural overview of the genre of superheroes and the Marvel empire. Narratives of superheroes began to circulate in popular culture during the 1930s with the DC comics phenomenon. The visual artistry and matching of illustrations with text and plot produced a uniquely new form of weekly reading material. The development of the DC and Marvel superheroes of the 80s and 90s built on Asian illustrated traditions and forged new relationships between East and West comics and graphics styles. Today, the genre is among the most dominant cultural forms worldwide. This course will introduce you to the comics and graphic novel literary genre and their movie spin-offs. The course will also have a workshop element and seek graphic and illustrated responses from students. Above all, the course will investigate the role of the superhero. Who is this superhero, or rather what is a superhero? Why does the fantasy of an individual with supernatural powers generate such fascination in modern society? These are some of the questions we will explore during this course. The genre’s transformations over the last nine decades reflect both political, cultural, and social changes. We will explore a broad variety of different superhero incarnations in both film, texts, and graphic novels. Subjects to be discussed include mythology, genre, science and technology, crime and vigilantism, identity, gender and sexuality as well as transnationalism and geopolitics. Anyone interested in popular culture, animation, DC comics, the graphic novel, fantasy and superheroes are welcome to attend this course.
3
ENGE2150 Nineteenth-Century Novels on Screen
This course studies the relationship between words on the page and audio-visual moving images on the screen by focusing on the adaptations of classic nineteenth-century novels. We will look at several nineteenth-century authors who have been particularly popular with screen adaptations, including Austen, Dickens, and Hardy. By close reading of their texts and careful viewing of the big and small screen adaptations of these novels, we will consider the specificity of the textual and the visual media in the narrative, thematic, and aesthetic aspects. The course will explore the interaction between literature and film/television in terms of forms and stylistics, and make broader cultural and historical enquiries about the issues of gender, nationhood, class, and power that will illuminate the nineteenth-century literature in general and its relevance to the present.
3
ENGE2160 American Popular Song Lyric
(UGED2193 is double-coded with ENGE2160.) Focusing on song writers and performers from the USA, this course introduces students to the art of the popular song lyric of the twentieth century. In the process of studying American popular song lyrics, students will learn about such musical genres as “the blues,” “gospel,” “tin pan alley,” “folk,” “country,” and “rock and roll” as well as the elements of American history that give rise to each of these types of musical lyric. Since one of the course elements is the relationship of musical lyric to musical sound, we will spend considerable class time listening to popular songs , paying attention to the way a lyric’s meaning is conveyed through such elements as vocal style and musical arrangement.
3
ENGE2170 Literature & Medicine
This interdisciplinary course of critical medical humanities examines contemporary literary and filmic texts that shape ethical thought about health and wellbeing. We will read major texts that problematize and hypothesize the relation between self and community; immunity and toxicity; power and medical interventions; faith and healing; and knowledge and narrative. This course aims to widen the “medical” beyond the scene of clinical encounter through close engagements with critical theory about the body and the self as embodied subjectivity. In our readings, we will discuss and debate the meaning and practices of responsibility, endurance, and imagination that challenge assumptions about the illness experience, caregiving, and the production of medical knowledge.
3
ENGE2180 Intercultural Communication and Engagement Abroad
(UGED2184 is double-coded with ENGE2180.) This online course is designed to help students make the most of education abroad by enhancing their intercultural awareness and sensitivity as they explore the host environment and interact with locals and other international students. Except for a few pre-departure tasks, all work is done online while students are abroad. Through exposure to relevant theories, readings, and other resources, this course aims to help students develop a deeper understanding of what it means to be interculturally competent and global-minded as they immerse themselves in the host culture. While they critically reflect on their second language/intercultural interactions and share their experiences with peers, they are encouraged to become more curious, open-minded, and actively engaged in the world around them.
3
ENGE2190 Gods Behaving Badly: Myths and Legends from Around the World
(UGED2197 is double-coded with ENGE2190.) The course will consider myths and legends from around the world with particular sensitivity to one peculiar aspect of them: that the gods depicted in them often behave no better than the people whose lives they determine. In order to explain why this is the case, the course will seek to understand the nature and function of myth, and the complex uses to which they are put in order to explain some of our most pressing questions: How did we all begin? Where are we? Who are we? Why is there so much wrong with the world? What’s the solution? Where will we go when we die? How will it all end? Although the concept of myth might seem outdated in modern secular culture, by drawing comparisons between the ancient and contemporary worlds, students will be encouraged to see how myth-making of some kind is as inevitable and innately human as the questions which prompt it. The course will begin by establishing some archetypal similarities between myths – from myths of Creation to myths of Apocalypse – and then consider myths from specific cultures – including Greco-Roman, Scandinavian, and Chinese – before considering the appeal of myth in contemporary popular culture, especially The Lord of Rings, and Game of Thrones.
3
ENGE2200 Authors and Authority
This course explores the complex relationships between authors and the various forms of authority that they have written under, or written about. It will broadly consider the ways literature has been deployed to challenge socio-political authority, as well as to affirm, publicise, and legitimise it. More specifically, it will consider: literary representations of authority, literary attempts to deconstruct authority, political attempts to banish literature, literary strategies of speaking to authority, the use of literature to legitimise authority, and the ways literature can establish its own authority. Students will be encouraged to recognise that, though literature is popularly seen as a means to challenge authority, it has often also been used as an agent of authority. In fact, the words “author” and “authority” come from the same Latin root, auctor meaning “an originator, causer, doer.” What similarities are there between authorial authority and socio-political authority? To what extent do they make competing claims to legitimacy? And when do their separate claims to legitimacy come into alignment?
3
ENGE2210 Song and Poetry: The Literature of Song and Song-Writing
This course takes a closer look at the intimate connections between song and poetry. The history of song has always been closely connected with the oral tradition in literature; conversely, the musicality of literature owes much to the song tradition. Gospel, Negro Spirituals, Folk Music, the Bard Tradition, the Sean Nós tradition, the ballad and the lyric form in poetry, as well as popular music and musicals will all be examined on this course. The course will examine the different song traditions in their social and political contexts. The course will also include a song-writing element. There will be a song-writing workshop with a well-known local songwriter. Students will be asked to write a song in any genre of their choice (folk song, protest song, spiritual song etc.) and then to have that song performed either by themselves or someone else in the class. No previous studies in literature or music are needed to take this course. Students interested in exploring the connections between song and poetry and between song-writing and the poetic craft are welcome to attend this course.
3
ENGE2300 Drama: from the Jacobean Period to the Restoration
After surveying the origins of English drama (morality and mystery plays, Senecan tragedy, the development of playhouses, etc.), tragedy will be discussed with particular attention paid to the ways in which playwrights of the period treat the theme of revenge, their tragic conception of the universe, and the dramatic techniques they employ. The Restoration period will deal with the heroic tragedy and the comedy of manners. Representative works by some of the following authors will be covered: Kyd, Marlowe, Tourneur, Webster, Middleton, Ford, Dryden, Otway, Wycherley, Etherege, Congreve, etc.
3
ENGE2310 Drama: from Ibsen to the Present
The first part of this course studies representative plays, English and European, of the late nineteenth century to mid-twentieth century, and their significance in the development of modern drama. The second part of the course studies plays of the past thirty years and their relation to contemporary ideas about the human condition. Representative works will normally be selected from the following authors: Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Synge, Pirandello, Brecht, Chekhov, Miller, O’Neill, Sartre, Beckett, Ionesco, Osborne, Pinter, Fry, Wesker, Arden, Stoppard, etc.
3
ENGE2320 Eighteenth-and Nineteenth-Century Fiction
This course introduces students to the rise and development of the novel as a genre in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when realism was widely accepted as the dominant mode of representing reality through fiction. Emphasis will be given to novelists such as: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, George Eliot, Hardy and others.
3
ENGE2340 Poetry: from the Renaissance to the Augustan Age
The genre of poetry will be studied in the light of important historical and literary landmarks in the Renaissance and the Augustan Age. The following are some of the items to be covered: The Elizabethan lyric, sonnet sequences, “metaphysical” poetry, examples from Milton and the development of the heroic-couplet from Dryden to Pope.
3
ENGE2350 Poetry: from the Romantics to the Modernists
The genre of poetry will be studied in the light of important historical and literary landmarks in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The main Romantic poets to be studied include: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. The main Modernist poets to be included: Yeats, Pound and Eliot.
3
ENGE2360 Children’s Literature
(UGED2194 is double-coded with ENGE2360.) This course provides a framework for understanding the themes and motifs of children's literature. It also looks at representations of children in literature. We will analyse some essential, central texts as well as contemporary popular books for children. The uses of fantasy and the educational aspects of books for children will be discussed, along with notions of childhood and adulthood. Through close reading of set texts, students will be able to engage in critical techniques applicable to most literature. This is because the best texts for children satisfy sensitive adult readers too.
3
ENGE2370 From Romanticism to Modernism
The early nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were important periods in the rise of modernity. The two most important artistic movements of these periods in Western culture were Romanticism and Modernism. The two periods will be studied and contrasted on this course. How does a writer describe the imagination, inspiration and love? How does a writer describe a person’s connection with nature? How does a writer describe the experience of growing up in a city? These are questions we will try and answer.
3
ENGE2380 Twentieth-Century Fiction
This course examines some of the key works of dystopian fiction written in the twentieth-century. It does so by thinking about the ways in which the book - that common symbol of culture and civilization - is treated in these works. The course begins by contextualizing the notion of dystopia and its cognates. After revealing a strong link between the dystopian image and the emasculation of culture, we move on to consider the particular visions of society presented by Ray Bradbury, George Orwell, and Anthony Burgess. As we shall see, they are visions of society that insist that we not only question our idea of "culture" but also how culture itself intervenes in the inevitable tension between state and individual.
3
ENGE2390 Reading Poetry
This course provides an introduction to the art of reading poetry. We will read and analyze a range of poems of diverse styles and forms from the Renaissance to the present day so as to stimulate students’ creative and critical responses to poetry. We will also read and analyze contemporary poetry written in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. While this is not a course on creative writing, it nonetheless explores, among other topics, the role of the imagination, the act of writing, the purposes of poetry, the notions of tradition and of the individual talent, for these are issues with which poets engage, whether directly or indirectly, in their poems.
3
ENGE2510 English Phonetics and Phonology
This course introduces students to basic concepts in phonetics, the scientific study of speech, and in phonology, the study of sound patterns in various human languages with principal emphasis on the English language. Students will gain an understanding of the articulatory mechanisms for producing consonants, vowels, as well as stress and intonation. They will be introduced to the International Phonetic Alphabet, and sounds from a variety of languages. In the phonology part of the course, students will analyze the patterns governing the distribution of sounds in different languages. A major aim of this course is to enable students to transcribe English words and utterances, and to develop an appreciation of the diversity and systematicity of sound structure in human language.
3
ENGE2520 Environmental Writing
(UGED2196 is double-coded with ENGE2520.) This course takes as its premise that environmental writing is environmental action. Environmental writing is also political engagement (biopolitics, as it were) as the ultimate aim of environmental writing is to effect policy change to protect, nurture, and sustain the environment and humankind. In this course, we will explore how to use different modes and genres of writing to effect environmental change. We will first examine the major elements of environmental writing through the exploration of different modes and genres, including children’s books, blogs, essays, poetry, songs, social media, Apps, newspaper articles, and posters. We will then examine the major environmental issues we are facing globally and in Hong Kong, and examine how environmental writing is currently being used in Hong Kong to engage the public and effect change. We will also investigate public awareness of the major environmental issues facing Hong Kong, to develop an understanding of how we can engage the public more effectively through writing. Finally, we will engage in our own environmental writing by creating three pieces of environmental writing, each examining the same environmental issue through a different type of writing. Key questions this course explores: • How can we use writing to raise awareness of environmental issues and effect environmental change? • What are the most pressing local and global environmental issues we face today? How is environmental writing currently being used in Hong Kong to engage the public and the government to respond to these issues? How can we use writing more effectively to engage the public and effect environmental change?
3
ENGE2530 Hong Kong English and its Culture
(UGEC2188 is double-coded with ENGE2530.) The objective of this course is to give students an overview of the status, features, and use of Hong Kong English (HKE), the variety of English commonly used in Hong Kong. In the first part of the course, students will be introduced to the concept of ‘world Englishes’ and examine different theoretical frameworks for conceptualizing the evolution of new varieties of English. The course then examines the history of English in Hong Kong in juxtaposition to both Cantonese and Putonghua, politically and in terms of educational policies and practices in Hong Kong. The second part of the course examines both spoken and written features of HKE, including grammar, discourse particles, vocabulary, and pronunciation, as well as the practices of code-mixing and code-switching. In the third part of the course, language attitudes and ideologies towards ‘standard’ language varieties (for example American and British English) in relation to HKE will be explored. The course will also examine the relationship between use of HKE and identity as well as gender.
3
ENGE2540 Forensic Linguistics: Language as Evidence in Legal Processes
This course introduces the role linguistics and linguists play in forensic science and legal investigations. Forensic linguists are like the Sherlock Holmes of language – they offer their expert opinions about linguistic evidence in the legal process. This course introduces some major topics in forensic linguistics, including authorship analysis, speaker identification, trial discourse, plagiarism and collusion, and linguistic evidence in cybercrime. High profile cases where forensic linguists have contributed to legal investigations will be discussed. Students will also be introduced the methods and tools commonly used in forensic linguistic analyses of spoken and written data. No prior knowledge of law is required.
3
ENGE2600 World Englishes and Their Cultures
(UGEC2189 is double-coded with ENGE2600.) Although English has long spread around the world, the consequences of this spread are only now beginning to be appreciated by its speakers in their many locations. The discourse of world Englishes aims to re-imagine our understanding of the English language. The difference between error and innovation can no longer be decided by reference to ‘ownership’ of the language. Additionally, the language is beginning to be a medium of the expression of identity for more and more people in very different contexts. World English must be pluralized, which is why we think in terms of world Englishes. This course is split into two sections. The first section will introduce you to issues in the discourse of world Englishes: innovation, variety, creativity, globalization, etc. The second section will look at specific case studies of Asian Englishes, such as the use of English in Singapore, China, and Japan.
3
ENGE2620 Acquisition of English as a Second Language
This module will review and critique past and current theories of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) from a range of theoretical perspectives: linguistic, cognitive, psychological and social. It will also examine the wide range of factors which affect the outcome of SLA. It will then continue by outlining the implications for teaching and learning and how far these have an impact on approaches, methods, strategies and techniques in the classroom.
3
ENGE2630 Sociolinguistics: Languages, Culture, and Society
Language, culture, and society are intimately connected, each one influencing the others. This relationship between language, culture, and society is the concern of sociolinguistics. Topics covered in this course include code-mixing, language in the media, language variation, language attitudes, as well as language policy in education. Examples are drawn from different languages and cultures, with focus on the English language. Hong Kong issues are given particular consideration.
3
ENGE2640 Introduction to World Literature in English
This course surveys the variety of writing in English that is taking place around the world. In order to develop an appreciation of the range of writing in English, this course draws on different modes of literary expression such as novels, short stories, autobiographies and other kinds of writing. Importantly, many of the texts chosen will be those exploring aspects of cross-cultural, multilingual, or post-colonial experience – experiences which you may find resonate with your own experience of contemporary Hong Kong. In order to explore the richness of such experiences, this course draws on some relevant analytical approaches and literary theories.
3
ENGE2650 From the Renaissance to Enlightenment
ENGE2650 aims to provide students with a background to literary history from the late medieval period until the end of the 18th century. This focus necessarily involves paying considerable attention to European political, economic, religious, cultural, artistic, and intellectual trends; these provide a context for studying the literary works and preparing students for being CUHK English majors. This is a course in the history of ideas as mediated through literary texts.
3
ENGE2700 Drama in Performance II
Students will study short plays and excerpts from longer plays, workshop them in small groups, with the aim of performing pieces of similar length before an audience. Students will be taught how to interpret a play from a dramaturgical point of view, and be equipped with the fundamental techniques of voice production, creating a character, directing, and interpreting a text for performance. The specific focus of this course will be comedy.
3
ENGE2710 Language and Intercultural Communication
This course aims to help students enhance their communication with people who have a different language and cultural background. Topics include the concept of culture; language and cultural socialization; cultural variations in verbal and nonverbal communication; language, identity and biases; cultural diversity in perception, values, and worldview; intercultural-intimate relationships; culture shock and intercultural adjustment/adaptation; intercultural conflict and mediation; and English in the global workplace. This course should be of interest to local and international students, and is especially appropriate for those who plan to travel, study, or work abroad.
3
ENGE2720 Pedagogical Grammar of English
The aim of this course is to equip students with the grammatical knowledge that is essential for ESL teaching and learning. The first part of the course introduces students to key concepts involved in grammar pedagogy and teaching methodologies. The second part of the course covers grammatical forms and structures in English that may be particularly difficult for second language learners to acquire, with an emphasis on understanding the connection between form and meaning. Students apply what they have learned through conducting mini-lessons and team-teaching. At the end of the course, students should feel more confident about the use of grammar terminology in second language teaching and more knowledgeable about a task-based and discourse-oriented approach to grammar teaching in second language classrooms.

Prerequisite: ENGE 1520
3
ENGE2820 English Semantics and Pragmatics
This course is an introduction to the study of how language is used to communicate meanings. The earlier part of the course will deal with semantics, under two broad headings: lexical semantics (word meanings) and grammatical semantics (sentence meanings). Major topics in this part will include compositionality, semantic fields, prototype theory, and thematic roles. The second part of the course will deal with pragmatics, that is, how language communicates meanings in context. Major topics in this part will include speech acts, conversational implicatures, and politeness. The course will also look at idiomatic meanings and metaphor as ways of extending the semantic resources of language.
3
ENGE2840 Lexical Studies in English
This course introduces students to the study of English words and vocabulary acquisition. In the first part of the course, we will look at the evolution of the English vocabulary such as historical influences and semantic change. Then we will look at English morphology and word formation, which will be followed by topics on meaning relations and semantic fields. In the second part of the course, the focus will shift to the acquisition of vocabulary and we will start by discussing whether English has a core vocabulary and what it means to know a word. Then topics on semantic transfer, collocation, academic vocabulary and also practical techniques in vocabulary teaching will be covered.
3
ENGE2870 English Words
This course introduces students to the basic concepts in morphology, that is, the study of the internal structure of words. Students gain an understanding of the basic components of English words and learn how to analyze their internal structure in terms of roots, affixes, and morphemes. Major processes in English word formation, including inflection and derivation, blending, back-formations, and clipping are also introduced. The course also deals with formation processes beyond individual words by examining the structures of various types of compounds, including noun-noun compounds (paperback, egghead) and adjective-noun compounds (fast food, software). The course explores which word-formation processes are the most (and least) productive in contemporary English, introducing students to the linguistic factors that constrain the formation of new words in English, including semantic, phonological, and grammatical factors.
3
ENGE2950 English Literature and Culture Study Tour
The students spend two weeks in the U.K. attending plays, visiting sites relevant to their study of English literature, as well as museums and art galleries. The aim is to enrich and broaden the students’ linguistic and cultural understanding. The impact of the study tour will be optimized by thorough preparation, a policy of English usage during the study tour and a series of writing tasks focused on the plays attended and cultural sites visited, including a reflective Tour Journal, all of which will be assessed on their return. Pre-departure discussions will prepare the students for every aspect of the tour.
1
ENGE2960 The World in English: an Oxford Summer Programme
Students will be selected by a panel of senior staff based on achievement in relevant Department courses and willingness and likely capacity to benefit. Classes will be divided in two strands: “Literature, Linguistics and Society”; “Current Affairs: Britain and the World”. Oxford tutors will conduct 4 hours’ face-to-face teaching a day for 5 days a week. Students will spend some evenings and weekend days in excursions to London and Stratford for plays and other cultural sites. Fieldwork and cultural explorations will be closely supervised by College nominees and/or Department staff. Full reflective essays and diary-plus-video are required of all participants for presentation within CUHK at their own college presentation evenings, and to other English Department majors at university orientation events. Each student on return will be expected to volunteer for either a teaching role for underprivileged students or one of CUHK’s ICARE service projects (Possibility of financial contribution being waived for needier candidates). Classes will take place in St Hilda’s College Oxford for 3 weeks during the summer term, between second and third years.
3
ENGE3000 Issues in Comparative Literature
This course examines the field of comparative literature through a variety of readings in English and Chinese. It aims to introduce students to the main theories and methodologies of comparative literature and offers practical exercises in the application of these various approaches. After a preliminary discussion of the definition and scope of the field, other areas touched upon are: influence/reception studies; period/movement studies; genre/style studies; thematology/myth studies; interdisciplinary studies (e.g., literature and the other arts, literature and psychology, literature and linguistics, literature and literary theory).
3
ENGE3100 Communications for English Majors III
The aim of the course is to build on the skills that students acquired in previous communication courses and to further enhance their writing and speaking competence in preparation for more advanced major courses and also the future workplace. Using a short novel as the basis for three written assignments, students will practice how to summarize, interpret and analyze literary texts. Feedback from peers and teachers will enable students to identify areas for improvement and polish their writing skills. Next, the course will provide guidance to students for writing their cover letters and resumes with the purpose of highlighting their strengths, accomplishments and aspirations. In the last past of the course, we will discuss how to prepare for job interviews and conduct practice to hone students' oral self-presentation skills. It is hoped that by the end of the course, students can become competent and confident users of English across a variety of contexts and requirements.
3
ENGE3110 Romanticism
The course will involve an in-depth study of Romanticism and evaluate its significance in English poetic tradition. It will cover the six major Romantic poets, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats, and from some characteristics they share, outline the ‘sprit’ of their age. At the same time, the course will also emphasise the distinctiveness of each Romantic poet, to demonstrate the complexity and diversity contained in the term ‘Romanticism’. We will study the representative poems of each poet carefully in relation to his aesthetic ideas and life experience. The course will emphasise close reading, but it will also draw attention to the relationship between text and context, poetry and poet, poetic creation and critical value.
3
ENGE3120 Modernism
This course introduces students to Modernism as a literary and historical movement which attempted to redefine the major concepts of art, the role of artist and the value of aesthetics as offered and established by tradition. Emphasis will be put on the historical factors and implications of this significant cultural change from tradition to modernity. Works to be discussed may be drawn from poetry, drama, fiction, as well as other creative and critical forms of discourse.
3
ENGE3150 English Language and Literature
This course is an introduction to literary stylistics, which, to put it at its simplest, is the application of linguistics to the study of literature. Its aim is to give some sense of the distinctiveness of literary uses of language in both poetry and prose. Non-literary as well as literary stylistics are studied so that an awareness of both the continuities and discontinuities between literary and nonliterary uses of language can be developed. The main theme of this course is that, while literature cannot be defined in terms of any distinctive language patterns, the study of language patterns that are central to or typical of it can give real insight into its nature.
3
ENGE3160 Major Concepts in American Literature
From year to year the readings and the themes emphasized in this course will vary. Among the themes that enter more or less prominently into varying interpretations of American literature are egalitarianism, democracy, egotism, restlessness, regionalism, humour, lawlessness, hostility to traditional forms and ways of doing things, homoeroticism, and (especially in the twentieth century) the city, materialism, and the perils of the machine. Nineteenth-century writers who may be represented include Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Melville, Dickinson, Twain and James. Twentieth-century writers who may be represented include Cather, Frost, Anderson, Stevens, William Carlos Williams, Pound, Ransom, Cummings, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, Miller, Mailer, Updike, Robert Lowell and Sylvia Plath.
3
ENGE3170 Major Concepts in European Literature
This course introduces students to some seminal European texts of the nineteenth century. Topics for discussion include: (a) realism (e.g., Balzac, Flaubert, Turgenev, Shaw) as an aesthetic form capable of reflecting society and its concerns; (b) symbolist poetry (e.g., Baudelaire, Poe, Mallarmé, Yeats) as an important source for Anglo-American modernism; (c) other major writers’ works expressing some of the major issues of the century (e.g., Dickens, Dostoievsky, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, Georges Sand, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy).
3
ENGE3180 Major Concepts in World Literature
This course invites students to cross cultures by comparing or contrasting certain themes as they are expressed in major representative works of the West and the East. Its starting point will be the Middle Ages in Europe and the Tang Dynasty in China, leading into the twentieth century. Some attention will also be given to India and Japan. Among the themes considered will be the transcendent and the immanent, fate and free will, death and rebirth, reward and punishment, faith and reason, revolution and reformation, classicism and romanticism, capitalism and communism, male and female, war and peace.
3
ENGE3190 Literature and Culture
This course investigates the basic concepts and issues relevant to a critical understanding of the relationship between literature and culture in the context of socio-historical changes. Selected literary works will be read as the expression of cultural problems and cultural analysis attempted in the light of its broader implications for literary interpretation. While the specific topic may vary from year to year, some typical examples are: popular culture, postmodern culture, third-world culture, revolutionary culture, culture and resistance and comparative culture.
3
ENGE3200 Literature and Art
This course may range from a concentrated study of specific topics to considerations of general principles in aesthetics/ philosophy. Under this course heading, various inter-disciplinary or comparative studies of literature and other subjects can be offered, for example, literature and painting/ sculpture, literature and architecture, literature and music, and others.
3
ENGE3210 Literature and Religion
This course will approach the relations between literature and religion with regard to both "form" and "content". Its first part will concentrate on overall questions about the nature of language patterns and uses in both religious and literary contexts. There are a number of very striking similarities here, and we will ask what these say about the nature of both religion and literature. This course's second and final parts will concentrate on insights about religious and literary forms of language and their uses to the study of particular literary, and to some extent religious, texts. The religious dimension of the course will relate mainly to Judaeo-Christian forms of religion, but attention will also be given to other, particularly of course Chinese, forms of religion.
3
ENGE3220 Literature and Film
(UGED3143 is double-coded with ENGE3220.) The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the kindred relationships between film and literature as well as their essential mediumistic differences such as film and the novel, film and drama/theatre, film and poetry, etc. Their similar or different uses of time and space, and problems of adaptation will be discussed in some works which have both filmic and literary versions.
3
ENGE3230 Gender and Literature
This course explores critically the relationship between gender and literature in specific sociocultural contexts. Some basic arguments in the feminist perspectives on literary study will be introduced and selected works by both male and female writers discussed. While topics may vary from year to year, some typical examples are: the representation of woman, gender identity and difference, literature and desire, sexuality and imagination, and writing under patriarchy.
3
ENGE3250 Other Literatures in English
This course is an introduction to African literature. Indeed, it is a course that introduces you to the work of four of the most widely-respected African authors - Amos Tutuola, Chinua Achebe, Pepetela, nad J.M. Coetzee. After first questioning the meaning of the very term "African literature," we go on to highlight and examine some of the most salient features and issues surrounding African literature - most explicitly, those relating to colonialism, the novel form in Africa, languages of Europe as literary languages of Africa, the tension between traditionalism and the African novel, and the relationship between politics and the African novel.
3
ENGE3260 Creative Writing
This course is structured as: (i) a series of writing workshops; and (ii) projects that facilitate the writing of poetry. While we will look at the manifestos of poets and explore debates in the field of poetics, the bulk of this course is ultimately focused on the act of writing. We will explore how one may learn from the works of canonical poets so as to hone one’s writing skills. There also will be some emphasis on exploring local and international publishing avenues, whether online or in print. There will also be sessions on how to present one’s own poems.
3
ENGE3270 Literature and Education
Education is one of the major ways in which a society imparts knowledge and skills on, and develops the characters and potentials of, its citizens. In this course, we will explore the topic of education in literature by focusing on fiction and drama from various historical and cultural contexts. The course will examine issues which are both socio-cultural and literary, and which will include: the impact of education and teachers on individual development and growth as represented in the texts; the ideological implications of education and teachers; and a comparison between the ways education is valued in the East and the West. It will also analyze the socio-historical contexts behind the works, in order to understand how these helped shape the portrayals of education and teachers in them. Some of the questions the course will tackle are: What does education have to do with literature? How does the representation of education and the teacher figure vary across writers, time, place and culture? What are some of the assumptions behind and implications of these different portrayals? What relevance does thinking about education and the teacher in literature have on literature students? How can humanities students conceive of the significance of their own educational experience? Why are such questions so important for the context of Hong Kong?
3
ENGE3280 Writing a Life Between Languages
This course aims first to introduce students to autobiography, one of the most popular forms of writing in the contemporary world. It will raise such questions as, why has this kind of narrative been so attractive to writers in cross-cultural situations, such as Chinese-Americans? The course will focus specifically on a group of (mainly American) immigrant autobiographers who write about the experience of living between a first language and English. They raise a range of fascinating questions about language and identity. Students will be asked to reflect on these questions and on the similarities and differences between these writers’ lives and their own experience in Hong Kong. The course will aim to teach students how to approach, analyse and theorize about autobiographical narratives. Students will be given opportunity to develop their analytical skills in essay-type responses to the prescribed texts. They will also be given opportunity to develop their narrative skills in their own life-writing, using the prescribed texts as models. Both forms of written exercise are designed to extend, as well as test, students’ understanding of autobiography as a genre.
3
ENGE3290 Reading and Writing Short Stories
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the art of the short story. Through reading well-crafted stories, students will learn how to appreciate short fiction and become familiar with the different elements of the short story form: plot, point of view, dialogue and action, character development as well as language, voice and style. A main focus of the course will be to look at how language is used and manipulated to create meaning in the texts.
Human beings tell stories to find meaning and make sense of their lives. We are born with the need to listen to stories – and to tell them. Students who are interested in writing short stories will be able to apply the techniques discussed in class to their own work and have their stories workshopped.
3
ENGE3300 Writing for the Stage
This course is a play-writing seminar and workshop and aims to deepen students’ understanding of drama as well as giving them practical experience in creating original theatrical works. In a seminar setting, the class will read and analyse some works of modern English-language playwrights, as well as practise various styles and genres of drama during in-class writing exercises. The students will engage in intensive reading and critique of one another’s work and spend time writing and rewriting independent assignments such as dialogues, monologues, and scenes, culminating in the creation of a one-act play that will be performed in either a staged production or dramatic reading at the end of the term.
3
ENGE3310 Writing for the Screen
This course is a film-writing seminar and workshop, which gives students both theoretical understanding of how films (both feature and short) work and practical experience in creating original short screenplays, as well as a grounding for longer works. The class will read film screenplays, as well as analysis of film and the screenwriting process. Students will also watch and analyse short films, scenes from longer works, and entire feature films (which will be screened outside of class hours). They will practise various elements of the film-writing process and engage in intensive reading and critique of one another’s work. Besides weekly short writing assignments, the students will work on two short film screenplays—one an adaptation of a literary work and the other a completely original piece. Each student will then produce, or participate in the production of, one of these film scripts as a short video.
3
ENGE3320 Hong Kong Literature in English
This course investigates Hong Kong literature in English from the twentieth century onwards, looking at its representations of Hong Kong, its people, and its varying political and social issues. The texts in this course were published originally in English and written either by Hong Kong authors, and/or set significantly in Hong Kong. They were chosen for the importance that Hong Kong plays in them in a wide variety of ways. Set in different decades, written in different genres, and drawing on a range of themes, these works allow us to appreciate the unique vibrancy, hybridity and contradictions that comprise Hong Kong: for instance, as a rural but also urban space; as a place of restless transition but also as a permanent home; and as a place of both divide and continuity across generations and cultural groups. We will constantly move between literary and theoretical exploration and their application to real-life issues in Hong Kong, encouraging students’ sense of personal participation in constructing individual notions of what “Hong Kong” means.
3
ENGE3340 Nineteenth-Century Literature
The course introduces students to English literature written in the Victorian period. Students will read and analyze Victorian literature drawn from the beginning to the end of the period, and from a range of different genres. Among the themes which may be investigated are religion, identity, propriety, morality, social class, reform, and gender. The course will also explore the relationships between literary themes and methods across these decades, and changing historical contexts and social issues. Time permitting, comparisons may also be drawn between such literary works and their visual representations, whether in film or art.
3
ENGE3350 Literature and Politics
This course will cover key texts that deal with the relationship between literature and political theory. The course examines how major writers have dealt with such topics as nationalism, self-determination, political independence, totalitarianism, terrorism and animal rights. The course will introduce students to the political and historical context of each piece of writing and then examine the text in light of the relevant political theory. It will examine how political ideologies such as Marxism, socialism and conservatism have been important as motivating factors both for artists and critics. The course will examine political writings from a range of genres and from a range of literary periods.
3
ENGE3360 Special Topics in Creative Writing
This course is designed to investigate topics in creative writing not normally covered under generic creative writing courses. It may involve any one or more of the following areas in creative writing studies: literary community and global citizenship, writing for new media, creative writing and other arts, creative writing and social enterprises, phenomenology and creative writing, creative writing and research, writing speculative fiction, writing flash fiction, teaching creative writing, history of creative writing, and the writing of auto-ethnography. Students are allowed to take the above course more than once and gain the units each time they pass the course. However, students cannot take courses with the same course code more than once in a single term.
3
ENGE3370 Writing Hong Kong
This course focuses on the art of writing about Hong Kong. Through the use of writing prompts, it introduces students to the different ways of writing about different social and physical environments in Hong Kong. Students will be able to discuss and articulate the feelings, thoughts and experiences evoked by these social and physical environments. They will be able to produce writings that evoke the sense of place that is unique to Hong Kong. They will be able to consider issues such as genre, gender and language use in relation to readership. Through active participation in class discussion and exploration of actual environments, students will acquire different perspectives and understand the diverse possibilities in relation to writing about Hong Kong. They will be able to assess their own writing and those of others.
3
ENGE3380 The Contemporary African Novel
This course introduces students to a selection of new writing from the African continent. It does so in order to demonstrate the diversity of writing emerging from the multiple and diverse contexts present in the continent. Although primarily interested in writing in English, this course may also explore works in translation to bring into sharp relief the heterogeneous and variegated nature of the contemporary African novel. The focus on contemporary writing from the continent (read as works published within the last 10 years) means that writers other than those typically studied on such courses are to be read. The emphasis here is on the introduction of new writers to students, and the socio-historical contexts in which they write. To this end, students will enrich their understanding of world literature. Although not required, those who have taken ENGE3250 “Other Literature in English – An Introduction to African Literature” prior to this course will be in an advantageous position.
3
ENGE3390 The London Novel
This course examines the various ways in which London has been represented in a selection of diverse contemporary novels. Through both the close-reading of specific passages from the set novels and a general engagement with secondary theoretical material, it will become clear that the city continues to be represented in many different ways. From this observation emerges the realization that London is in fact, and has always been, an assemblage of very different Londons. It is this important observation that leads to the key conclusion of the course – no act of representation can ever fully capture its object of enquiry and, because of this, what has been chosen to be represented is always the product of a political decision.
3
ENGE3500 Shakespeare
This course introduces students to the playwright William Shakespeare. By reading a number of Shakespeare’s plays, drawn from the genres of comedy, history, tragedy and romance, students will achieve an understanding of Shakespeare’s language, his modes of characterization, his methods of creating dramatic situations, and his representative themes. Students will also study the relationship of Shakespeare’s scripts to their original Elizabethan and Jacobean performance contexts. Time permitting, attention will also be given to the performance history of Shakespearean drama and the continuing importance of that drama in twentieth-first century world theatre.
3
ENGE3600 Contrastive Linguistics
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts in contrastive linguistics through a comparative study of English and Chinese. The course will begin by introducing students to language transfer for a better understanding of the role of L1 in second language learning. English and Chinese will then be compared on the phonological, morphological and lexical levels. Different skills required in reading English and Chinese will also be introduced. Next, we move on to conceptual metaphors and will look at the use of metaphorical expressions in the two languages. In the lecture on contrastive pragmatics, we will explore how politeness strategies differ across cultures, with the focus on compliment response strategies. Then the major grammatical, syntactic and textual features of English and Chinese will be presented and some salient contrasts between them will be highlighted. The findings of such an English-Chinese contrastive analysis will be highly relevant to language teaching and learning as differences between the two languages are commonly reflected in errors made by second language learners.
3
ENGE3610 Psycholinguistics
This undergraduate course is an introduction to psycholinguistics — the study of how human beings comprehend, produce, and acquire language in vivo. This is in contrast to the more static view on language or the study of it in other areas of theoretical linguistics. One guiding question in this course is what psycho-linguistic mechanisms support the unique human capacity for language (and how they operate). We will explore this question from a multi-disciplinary perspective, combining insights and tools from cognitive psychology, linguistics, cognitive neuroscience, and computer science. Topics we will cover include visual and auditory recognition of words, sentence comprehension, speech production and errors, language acquisition, neural representation of language, bilingual language processing, simultaneous interpretation, aphasia and language disorders. In this course, students will learn to design psycholinguistic experiments using experimental paradigms such as priming, self-paced reading, and language switching tasks. Other advanced methodologies (e.g. electrophysiology, eye-tracking, and fMRI technologies) will also be introduced.
3
ENGE3630 Language, Cognition, and Education
This course presents insights from cognitive linguistics and their potential relevance to second and foreign language teaching. The course addresses core concepts in this area of study including: prototype, perspective, categorization, image schema, figure and ground, metaphor, metonymy, entrenchment, embodied cognition, construction grammar, etc. The course discusses how cognitive linguists design pedagogical methods and stimulate learners to explore the deeper meanings of language forms.
3
ENGE3640 English Language Teaching and Learning
This course is designed for students who are interested in the teaching and learning of English as a foreign/second language. The course examines different aspects of English language teaching, including the four major skill areas – reading, writing, listening, and speaking – as well as the teaching of grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. In the examination of these different language areas, the course first focuses on the acquisition and development of these areas, asking the question of how learners acquire/develop vocabulary/grammar/pronunciation as well as reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the foreign/second language. After the learning and development of each of these skill areas has been examined, the course focuses on the teaching of each of these areas. In this discussion, the course will examine curriculum design, models, tasks, and techniques for teaching each language area.
3
ENGE3670 Language, Meaning, and Text
This course introduces some major approaches as well as basic principles and tools in the analysis of texts. Concepts such as cohesion and coherence, relevance, context, and identity are drawn upon to analyze a range of discourses and text types in our contemporary society. Texts to be discussed include advertisements, news reports, interviews, political speeches, websites, book reviews, etc. The relevance of discourse analysis to foreign/second language teaching may also be considered.
3
ENGE3680 History of the English Language
This course presents an overview of the origins and development of the English language from its earliest beginnings to the present day. The development of the language through its different stages is outlined: Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, Present Day English. The influence of the social and historical background is exemplified throughout the course. The positive values of English as an international language are compared with the dangers of linguistic and cultural imperialism.
3
ENGE3690 Gender and Language
This course provides an introduction to the relationship between gender and language use. Drawing from empirical and theoretical studies in sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and discourse analysis, this course addresses a range of issues. Examples of key issues include the acquisition of gender-differentiated language, gender and conversational interaction (e.g. extralinguistic constructions of gender or politeness, hedging or interruptions), sexism in language, gender images, and the relationships among language, gender, and other social constructs such as class, culture, and ethnicity.
3
ENGE3730 Communication in Second Language Classrooms
This course focuses on the dynamics of communication in second or foreign language instructional settings, with special emphasis on the Hong Kong context. The aim is to better understand the ways in which the nature of classroom communication affects how and what second or foreign language students learn. Students discuss and assess factors that influence the nature of communication, including teachers’ control over the patterns of classroom interaction and learners’ use of language.
3
ENGE3740 Language Planning and Policy
This course introduces the field of language planning and policy (LPP). With a special focus on Asian countries, it provides historical accounts of LPP issues in a range of contexts and critically reviews current trends and research. It explores how policies are closely tied to sociolinguistic, cultural, geopolitical, and economic forces. The rise of English as the lingua franca of international communication is examined in relation to local cultures, language politics, and identities.
3
ENGE3750 Intercultural Transitions: Making Sense of International Experience
This web-enhanced course is designed for students in all Faculties with recent or current international experience (study abroad, international exchange, volunteering, service-learning, internships, educational travel, work or residence abroad). In relation to their own (and others’) international experience, students explore such topics as language/culture shock, intercultural adjustment, reentry, identity expansion, intercultural/global citizenship, and intercultural competence in a second language. Through critical reflection, reading, discussion, and writing, students develop a deeper understanding of their international experience and discover ways to incorporate it into their CUHK life and post-graduation plans.
3
ENGE3760 English Sociolinguistic Variation
This course focuses on a quantitative analysis of linguistic variation. Course content includes a discussion of the principles of linguistic variation, the sociolinguistic variable, and variation data collection and analysis. Research on variation and various linguistic (e.g., linguistic environment) and extralinguistic (e.g., gender, social class, identity) factors is examined, with an emphasis of the relationship between group and individual variation. The first and second language acquisition of variation is also examined.
3
ENGE3770 Bilingualism: Cognition and Society
The rise of English as a global language lights the fuse for bilingualism (and multilingualism). This course aims to introduce theories and research findings concerning bilingualism and related phenomena. Bilingualism is both individual and societal. The first half of the course focuses on bilingual development within individuals. Topics include bilingual language development, factors affecting bilingual acquisition, bilingualism and aging, and cognitive advantages conferred by being bilinguals. The second half of the course turns to societal bilingualism. It will examine issues concerning language use, policymaking, and bi/multilingual education in different regions around the world, including but are not limited to the United States, Canada, Sweden, Singapore, and Hong Kong. As such, this course is set to provide a global outlook on cognitive and societal aspects of bilingualism research and practice. The course will be of interests to students who are keen on linguistics and literacy development, language education, cognitive science, and developmental psychology.
3
ENGE3850 Acquisition of English Phonology
This course follows from ENGE 2510 (not a prerequisite though it may be helpful to have taken the class). The course employs media and technology, including YouTube videos, phonetic analysis software, blogs, and a variety of English accent websites to examine the acquisition of a first language (L1) phonology and a second language (L2) phonology, and examines issues in acquisition such as transfer and markedness as well as whether and how age of learning impacts attainment in L2 phonology. The course also situates and examines L2 phonology acquisition and use in terms of the social environment. The course examines English as a global language, through the examination of accents of English worldwide, with a specific focus on accent and linguistic discrimination, accents and identity, and finally, the accent(s) of Hong Kong English.
3
ENGE3860 Advanced Grammatical Studies in English
This course follows on from ENGE1520 and will take a closer, more detailed look at the working of the grammatical system in English as well as the major principles and processes underlying sentence formation in English. This course draws insights from a range of grammatical approaches, not bound to one specific approach. This course should be of interest to students hoping to work in such professional fields as language education, language pathology, literary criticism, and translation, where the syntactic features of a writer’s prose style are important.

Prerequisite: ENGE 1520
3
ENGE3950 Digital Technologies for Language Learning
Focusing on the design and functionalities of various apps and platforms, this course discusses the key concepts and theories that underpin technology enhanced language learning. It introduces new and emerging digital tools for lexico-grammatical acquisition, speech recognition, online reading and digital media composition. By exploring how artificial intelligence (AI), chatbots, augmented / virtual reality (AR/VR) and gaming platforms operate, it draws attention to how these technologies mediate interactive and collaborative learning processes, and how their design, sociotechnical structures and algorithmic processes present various affordances and constraints. Through hands on experience with various apps and platforms, students will discover innovative ways these technologies can be used for autonomous learning and evaluate their appropriateness and effectiveness in achieving specific language learning purposes.
3
ENGE3960 Digital Literacy as Social Practice
Recognizing how technology has dramatically revolutionized not only the way we learn but also the way we work, communicate and interact with one another, this course examines diverse digital literacies that have become critical for agentive participation in the new social order. As people move fluidly across digitally-mediated spaces, how they negotiate their linguistic and semiotic resources shapes the way they construct their identities, acquire knowledge, and expand their social networks. Drawing on New Literacy Studies, this course demonstrates how digital literacy is not a neutral, technical competence, and that digital practices develop within broader social, political, and cultural contexts. Online spaces are circumscribed by competing and colluding ideologies, shaping new forms of inequality and social fragmentation. To respond to these issues, this course discusses the need to develop both functional and critical digital literacies to navigate and transform an increasingly technologized world.
3
ENGE3970 Language and the Internet
(UGEC3198 is double-coded with ENGE3970.) What happens to language when it goes online? Is the internet bad for the English language? Is online communication changing our relationships with others? Will emoji become a new language? This course examines the relationship between language and the internet. It explores how people use language on the internet as well as how new technologies are changing the ways we write and communicate. Internet platforms covered in this course include “traditional” ones such as email and discussion forums, and recent social media such as Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. Key research methods and theories of the emerging area of Internet Linguistics are also discussed. The course concludes by looking into the future of the English language on the increasingly globalized and multilingual internet.
3
ENGE4100 Major Author(s)
In this course, we will study the works of some of the major writers in English literature in the twentieth century (with the exception of one text, White Teeth, which was published in 2000 and is therefore strictly speaking a twenty-first century text) through close reading. The chronological treatment of the works will allow us to explore the progression from literary modernism to postmodernism in the twentieth century. However, the course is not interested in stable, fixed definitions of “modernism” or “postmodernism,” nor is it primarily about modernism or postmodernism. Although there will be reference to philosophically or theoretically important thinkers throughout, the focus is really on the literary texts, and their varied and idiosyncratic modernisms and postmodernisms. Deliberately basing our course on very broad conceptions of “modernism” and “postmodernism,” we will not work with a fixed, exhaustive list of characteristics, but instead discover our own list in the works studied.
The course will examine a variety of literary themes and critical issues, such as identity, power, gender, purpose, religion, terrorism, conformity, transgression, genetics, multiculturalism, and the interaction between form and content. It will also analyze the socio-historical contexts behind the works, in order to understand how the historical background helped shape the works. This will encourage a comparative approach between the authors and their context, with the purpose of deepening students’ understanding of the course material, and of how writers mutually influenced each other.
Apart from this focus on text and context, the course will ask students to actively link themes and theoretical ideas to our own context of Hong Kong through the tutorial presentations and a short visual/textual assignment to be shared with coursemates on Blackboard. This will enable us to see how the literary works covered are connected to the space in which we are studying them (in our own lives and in Hong Kong), and to practise expressing these links to others.
Some of the questions the course will ask are: What were the contributions made by a particular author to the development of literature? Are there any common themes we can discover in works by different writers, and why were these themes so important to them? What do the writing styles that different writers have tell us about their methodology and philosophy? How did the earlier authors engage with modernity, and the later ones with postmodernity? And how are these works directly relevant to us here in Hong Kong today?
3
ENGE4110 Love, Death, and God in English Renaissance Poetry
This course aims to cover some of the key poetic texts of the English Renaissance in order to explore two of their ongoing preoccupations: love and death. This course will explore the ways these texts use two aspects of the human experience to consider the nature of what lies beyond the human: the ideal, the metaphysical, and God. Where the love poetry of the period frequently idealizes the beloved into a kind of a divinity, Renaissance poetry which ruminates on the nature of mortality frequently does so under the eyes of a God who is, by turns, vengeful and merciful, benevolent and indifferent. While this course is thematic, it also covers many of the formal preoccupations of English Renaissance poetry. Some of these include: imitation, pastoral, paradox, metaphor, and epic form. Poems by Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton will be covered. These are some of the most important figures in English literature, but whose language and chronological distance make them daunting to many students. This course will not only make them more accessible, but it will teach students methods of close reading which will give them the skills to read other such difficult texts in the future.
3
ENGE4120 Reading Paradise Lost
This course focuses on a single, seminal work of English literature: Milton’s Paradise Lost. The length and complexity of the work make it ideally suited for the kind of focussed consideration that this course would provide. Some of the themes covered will be: the idea of literary imitation; the poet as prophet; the nature of sin; how to write about the ineffable; the power of persuasive language. These themes (and many more) are central to Paradise Lost, but are equally the concern of other texts by Milton as well as other writers in the period. Where possible, these additional works will be considered in order to shed light on Paradise Lost and to flesh out its complexities. Paradise Lost has also been the subject of a wide variety of literary critical approaches – reader response, new historicist, psychoanalytic – and these too will be considered over the duration of the course.
There will also be a significant emphasis placed on reading aloud in this course. Typically, a lecture will contain an hour of literary analysis from me followed 45 minutes of reading aloud performed by me and the students. Students will be allocated characters in the poem to read in preparation for each lecture.
3
ENGE4130 Issues in Literary Criticism
This course will introduce different issues and questions concerning literature, with the goal of allowing you to find questions to ask that best suit your own literary interests. Accordingly, the course will look at different questions to see what they offer us when we read different kinds of literature – different genres, from different places, and from different times. Whatever your literary interests, and whatever you may be planning to write about in future (for example, in the ‘Capstone’ course), this course will help you find suitable questions and ideas. In short, we will be thinking about different questions and asking them about different literary works. The issues we think about in this course should be ones you can return to again in future literary study – and, in principle, beyond your studies. Instead of introducing schools of literary criticism (feminism, structuralism, Marxism, etc.), this course will look at different critical questions that we can ask about literature – i.e. different issues in literary criticism. Different questions lead to different answers. This is not to say that all questions are equally good, and you will also get a chance to ask why certain questions are asked and others are ignored. The course book (Andrew Bennett and Nicholas Royle, An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory) is not a survey of different critical schools. Instead, it looks at the different questions we might ask about literature in thirty-eight very short chapters, each time exploring the issue through discussion of specific literature. It is often surprising in its choice of issues: mutants, laughter, ghosts, and moving pictures are all covered. Pleasure and creativity are also covered, and the creative style of the book raises a further question – how should we write about literature?
3
ENGE4140 Topics in East/West Comparative Literature
This course will investigate some critical concepts and literary theories within the context of East/West comparative literature. In this special context the advantages, problems and validity of applying Western theoretical models to Chinese literature such as romanticism, tragedy, comedy and bildungsroman will be considered.
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ENGE4150 Reading Dante’s Inferno
This course will focus on one seminal work of Western literature: Dante’s Inferno. The length and richness of this work make it ideally suited for the focussed, semester-long consideration this course will provide. Some of the themes covered will be: the concept of Hell, the nature of Sin, the poet as prophet, the medieval understanding of the cosmos, the uses of allegory. These themes not only exist in the Inferno, but will be substantiated and extrapolated by references to many of Dante’s other works, including Vita Nuova, Monarchia, and the Convivio. These other works, together with details of Dante’s political life, biography, and historical period will be brought to bear on the text as we read through it. Emphasis will also be put on the various literary critical approaches which have been taken to the text, including historicist, feminist, and psychoanalytic. Students are encouraged to take ENGE4120 Reading Paradise Lost either before or after taking this course.
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ENGE4240 Special Topics in Literature
An intensive study of a major issue in literary studies. Topic(s) will be defined from year to year by the Department of English. Offerings with different subtitles can be taken up for credit, up to a maximum of two times.
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ENGE4510 Shakespeare Festival
This course is offered to those students who are selected each year to represent the University in the Chinese Universities Shakespeare Festival. As such, it will be highly selective: only five students will be invited to sign up. Of these students, three will be actors, and two will be assistant directors. All undergraduates in the department will be invited to audition in mid November.
By the end of this course, students would have learned the fundamentals of Shakespearean stagecraft, voice production, creating a character, and expressive movement and gesture. They would also have learned the basic principles of technical aspects of production such as set, lighting, and costume design. Students will also have gained intimate knowledge of at least 3 Shakespearean plays which will be studied from both a literary critical and dramaturgical perspective.
Students will also have to submit an analytical essay which asks them to utilise what they have learned in the experience of putting on a play for production, and to reflect upon that process.
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ENGE4620 Critical Discourse Analysis
This course focuses on a contemporary approach to discourse analysis, Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), which investigates real language data from a social and ideological perspective. The course aims to provide students with the analytical toolkit for understanding ideologies and power relations in different discourse contexts. Major research methods of CDA are illustrated through a range of authentic spoken and written texts such as political speeches, classroom interaction, broadcast news reports, advertisements, and websites.

Prerequisite: ENGE 3670
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ENGE4650 Special Topics in Applied Linguistics
Over the past few decades, second/foreign language teaching has evolved from a pre-occupation with methods of teaching to a broader perspective of teaching and learning. Within this wider perspective, it is important that teachers not only concern themselves with how they teach, i.e. the methods/approaches and techniques they use, but also develop an understanding of how learners learn, i.e. the processes of learning. Hence, this course particularly focusses on a number of individual difference variables (e.g., personality, motivation, language aptitude, learning styles, and language learning strategies) that affect individuals’ ultimate level of language achievement.
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ENGE4660 Issues in Contemporary English Language Studies
This course focuses on some topic of interest that has not been discussed in other courses in the regular program. Topics to be introduced depend on the availability of expertise and are related to the form, use, or acquisition of the English language. Students are expected to develop an in-depth understanding of the topic through reading and discussion of related research, papers, and data analysis. Offerings with different subtitles can be taken up for credit, up to a maximum of two times.
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ENGE4700 Independent Research Project
In this capstone course, English majors in their final year of studies will carry out independent research on a topic approved by the Department and supervised by a teacher. It may involve a major essay (15-20 pages) in literature or linguistics, or it may be interdisciplinary. It may also take the form of a project or creative work such as a collection of poetry or short stories. The major paper/project must include critical reflection on the research process, build on undergraduate learning in the major, and make connections with future studies/career plans. The proposal for this course must be submitted to the Department before the term begins. At the end of the semester, all students taking ENGE 4700 will give an oral presentation and be evaluated by a panel of teachers and peers. This is a required course for all four-year students who have joined the Department of English during or after the 2012-2013 academic year.
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